Gangs of Pakistani Muslim men rape, beat and sexually exploit more than 1,400 young British girls, some as young as 11, over 16 year period in English town of Rotherham
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Gangs of Pakistani Muslim men rape, beat and sexually exploit more than 1,400 young British girls, some as young as 11, over 16 year period in English town of Rotherham

For years, police and authorities turned a blind eye for for of being branded racist

A story of rampant child abuse—ignored and abetted by the police—emerged out of the British town of Rotherham in Yorkshire in August 2014. Until then, its scale and scope would have been inconceivable in a civilized country. 

Its origins, however, lie in two related factors, firstly what one Labour MP called “not wanting to rock the multicultural boat” and secondly, the fear by police, council authorities and social workers of being branded as racist.

The Labour council of Rotherham stands accused of ignoring child sex abuse on an unimaginable scale for 16 years.

Children (almost entirely white British girls) as young as 11 were trafficked, beaten, and raped by large numbers of Pakistani Muslim men in Rotherham, South Yorkshire, the council commissioned review into child protection revealed.

At least 1,400 children were subjected to appalling sexual exploitation in Rotherham between 1997 and 2013, the report found.

Children as young as 11 were raped by multiple perpetrators, abducted, trafficked to other cities in England, beaten and intimidated, it said.

And shockingly, more than a third of the cases were already known to agencies. 

But according to the report's author: 'several staff described their nervousness about identifying the ethnic origins of perpetrators for fear of being thought racist'.

Laura Wilson

Rotherham teenage mother Laura Wilson, was brutally murdered by her Muslim lover, Ashtiaq Ashgar, for exposing their secret relationship to his family and bringing shame on the traditional Pakistani Muslim family.

Ashgar had sworn Laura to secrecy because  he was just using her for sex while his family were planning an arranged marriage for their son with a girl from Pakistan.

 Asgar

 When Laura Wilson exposed their secret affair to his family, Ashtiaq Ashgar decided to carry out what has been described as Britain's first white honour killing. Ashgar lured Laura to a canal where he stabbed her and threw her into the canal.

On May 2011 at Ashtiaq's trial, the court heard how after stabbing Laura, he threw her into the canal but she kept fighting for her life. A pathologist report found that the stab wounds to the head were actually done to keep her under the water.

Ashgar was sentenced to seventeen-and-a-half years imprisonment. "He showed no remorse, just upset at the time he got in jail", said Laura's mother, after he was sentenced.

Professor Alexis Jay, who wrote the report, released in August 2014, condemned the 'blatant' collective failures by the council's leadership, concluding: 'It is hard to describe the appalling nature of the abuse that child victims suffered.'[1]

Perhaps we can make a start by looking at what Denis MacShane, the former Labour MP for Rotherham, admitted upon the publication of Professor Jay’s report.

He hadn’t said anything at the time, he said, because “as a true Guardian reader and liberal Leftie”, he hadn’t wanted to rock the multicultural boat.

The landmark report exposed widespread failures of the council, police and social services.

The inquiry team noted fears among council staff of being labelled "racist" if they focused on victims' descriptions of the majority of abusers as "Asian" men.

Professor Jay said: "No-one knows the true scale of child sexual exploitation in Rotherham over the years. Our conservative estimate is that approximately 1,400 children were sexually exploited over the full inquiry period, from 1997 to 2013."

Revealing details of the inquiry's findings, Prof Jay said: "It is hard to describe the appalling nature of the abuse that child victims suffered."

Child victims doused in petrol

The inquiry team found examples of "children who had been doused in petrol and threatened with being set alight, threatened with guns, made to witness brutally violent rapes and threatened they would be next if they told anyone".

Five men from the town were jailed for sexual offences against girls in 2010, but the report said police "regarded many child victims with contempt".

The report found: "Several staff described their nervousness about identifying the ethnic origins of perpetrators for fear of being thought as racist; others remembered clear direction from their managers not to do so."

Failures by those charged with protecting children happened despite three reports between 2002 and 2006 which both the council and police were aware of, and "which could not have been clearer in the description of the situation in Rotherham".

Prof Jay said the first of these reports was "effectively suppressed" because senior officers did not believe the data. The other two were ignored, she said.

The inquiry team found that in the early-2000s when a group of professionals attempted to monitor a number of children believed to be at risk, "managers gave little help or support to their efforts".

The report revealed some people at a senior level in the police and children's social care thought the extent of the problem was being "exaggerated".

Prof Jay said: "The authorities involved have a great deal to answer for."

The report estimates 1,400 children were sexually exploited over 16 years, with one young person telling the report's author that gang rape was a usual part of growing up in Rotherham.

Prof Jay's report describes the abuse as "appalling" and says it included the rape of girls as young as 11 by "large numbers of male perpetrators".

Children were raped by multiple attackers, trafficked to other towns and cities in the north of England, abducted, beaten and intimidated, the report revealed.

The lack of reports was partly down to a fear of being racist, Prof Jay wrote, as the majority of the perpetrators were described as 'Asian men', and many were said to be of Pakistani origin. 

The spotlight fell on Rotherham in 2010, after Laura Wilson, 17, was murdered for bringing shame on the families of two Pakistani Muslim men who had used her for sex.

It was later revealed that social workers had known for six years that the white teenage mother was at clear risk from predatory Asian gangs, and had received information about certain adults suspected of targeting her from the age of 11.

Laura, 17, had been groomed by a string of British Muslim Pakistanis before she was stabbed and thrown into a canal to die for informing her abusers' families of the sexual relationships.

Her killer Ashtiaq Asghar, who was 18 at the time, was given a life sentence and will serve a minimum of 17-and-a-half years after he pleaded guilty to murdering Laura in October 2010.

In 2012, the council's Safeguarding Children Board published a serious case review but key passages which reveal they knew she was at particular risk from 'Asian men' had been blocked out with black lines

The uncensored report confirms that Laura, identified as Child S, had dealings with 15 agencies and identified 'numerous missed opportunities' to protect her.

It states that she eventually became 'almost invisible' to care professionals.

One girl, known only as 'Jessica' claims she was abused daily as a 14-year-old by a 24-year-old man after social services failed to accept that she was a victim of grooming.

On one occasion married father-of-two Arshid Hussain was even caught with the half naked schoolgirl under his bed but documents revealed that police arrested her - and let him go.

If this report is right in criticising how blame has too often in the past been ascribed just to “Asians”, it is itself too casual in blaming Islam or even Pakistanis in general. Part of the problem is that many of the culprits are of Pashtun tribal stock from Kashmir, regarded as “trouble” even by many Muslims and Pakistanis.

Ringleader of Rotherham child sex grooming gang jailed for 35 years

Some of the first convictions following the Jay report occurred in March 2016 with six people  convicted and sentenced for what the judge called an “appalling catalogue of offending”.

The ringleader of a gang which caused damage of “unimaginable proportions” by grooming, raping and abusing young teenage girls in Rotherham was jailed for 35 years.

Six members of the gang led by Arshid Hussain were sentenced to a total of 103 years for an "appalling catalogue of offending" that saw them abuse and threaten vulnerable girls with impunity and pass them around as sex objects.

 Hussain  brothers

Arsid Hussain, Basharat Husain, Bannaris Hussain, the three Muslim brothers who ‘owned’ Rotherham, sentenced to long jail terms

Three brothers, Arshid, Basharat and Bannaras Hussain - known as Mad Ash, Bash and Bono - formed a violent, gun-toting, drug-dealing family who appeared to operate with impunity in the South Yorkshire town, a court heard.

The victims had each suffered “immense psychological harm”, Judge Sarah Wright told Sheffield Crown Court, while the effect on their families and community had been devastating.

Women described how they were raped, beaten and passed between abusers and used as prostitutes by a gang led by the three men, who “owned” Rotherham.

The abused women described how they were targeted in their young teens and subjected to brutal treatment as they were passed around to men who raped and beat them.

Some of the victims said they were trafficked, locked up, physically assaulted and threatened with death.

Another victim, now 33, said she thought she was going to die when her hands and feet were tied and she had petrol poured over her. A woman, now 36, explained how she was abused from the age of 11 with Arshid passing her on to his brother and friends, often as “payment” for debts.

One girl said the Hussain brothers “owned” Rotherham, while another told the jury: “The police gave them a free card to do what they wanted.”

One police officer was even named by a victim who said he was actually having sex with girls involved in the exploitation.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) it is now involved in 55 ongoing investigations into “allegations about how South Yorkshire Police dealt with child sexual exploitation in Rotherham”.

The commission said these cover a range of allegations, from a failure to act on reported child sexual exploitation to corruption. The IPCC said it is undertaking “ongoing research and analysis work” into more than 194 allegations made by 41 complainants to date - 92 of the allegations relate to police officers who have been identified, but 102 involve as yet unidentified officers.

It said 54 officers have been named to date - 26 of these have been advised they are the subject of an investigation that, if proven, would amount to misconduct ,and the remaining 28 are subject to ongoing assessment. During the trial, one woman who spent three days describing how she was repeatedly abused and assaulted from the age of 11, told the jury how she told a detective called Kenneth Dawes about what happened but no action was taken.

She said: “He used to have sex with girls and he used to take drugs from people and pass them on to Ash.”

Amazingly, in one case the police even took the fight to the abused child. A 13 year old girl, “was found" by the police at 3am -- in a semi-derelict house alone with a large group of adult males. She was drunk, the result of having been supplied with alcohol, and there was evidence that her clothing had been disrupted.

She alone was arrested for a public order offence, detained, prosecuted, appeared before the Youth Court and received a Referral Order for which the court arranged ‘reparation’, drug and alcohol counselling, art psychotherapy and victim awareness sessions.”

What a wonderful example of crime-busting. It would be interesting to know what those “victim awareness sessions” were about. Incredibly, there’s a suggestion that the Pakistani abusers were seen as the victims of the abused child, a point confirmed by a reference in the report about the police:

“The sense was that if there had been any offence it had been by the girls, for luring the men in.” Those Pakistani abusers must have thought they were in paradise.

Fear of appearing racist trumped fears of more children being abused. Not only were negligent officials not prosecuted, they prospered. Shaun Wright, a former Labour councillor who was in charge of Rotherham children’s services during a five-year period when a blind eye was turned to the worst case of mass child abuse in British history, is now South Yorkshire’s Police and Crime Commissioner.

It’s impossible not to share that incredulous fury. Powerless white working-class girls were caught between a hateful, imported culture of vicious misogyny on the one hand, and on the other a culture of chauvinism among the police, who regarded them as worthless slags. Officials trained up in diversity and political correctness failed to acknowledge what was effectively white slavery on their doorstep. Much too embarrassing to concede that it wasn’t white people who were committing racist hate crimes in this instance.

Equally horrifying is the suggestion that certain Pakistani councillors asked social workers to reveal the addresses of the shelters where some of the abused girls were hiding.

Front-line youth workers who submitted reports in 2002, 2003 and 2006 expressing their alarm at the scale of the child sex-offending say the town hall told them to keep quiet about the ethnicity of the perpetrators in the interests of “community cohesion”.

Thanks to Professor Jay, it has been stated publicly for the first time that the fear of appearing racist was more pressing in official minds than enforcing the law of the land or rescuing terrified children. It is one of the great scandals of our lifetime.

Rotherham just the tip of the iceberg

Barely credible though we have all found the avalanche of revelations about what had been going on in Rotherham for 16 years, they reflect only one part of what has become the most horrifying scandal in modern Britain.

As was documented in Easy Meat: Multiculturalism, Islam and Child Sex Slavery [2], a March 2014 report from the Law and Freedom Foundation, similar tragedies have long been unfolding in towns and cities across the land, where, with the full connivance of social workers and the police, the criminal abuse of underage girls, many in state “care”, has been organised by largely Pakistani gangs of men on an industrial scale. It has then been systematically covered up by the very people who have allowed and even encouraged this to happen: council officials, police and politicians. From a fear of being called “racist”, police forces across the country have buried the evidence.

This will come as no comfort to the 1,400 brutalised girls, many of whom have self-harmed or committed suicide, but the Rotherham tragedy may be the final nail in the coffin of multiculturalism in Britain.

 



[1] http://www.rotherham.gov.uk/downloads/file/1407/independent_inquiry_cse_in_rotherham

[2] http://www.mensenhandelweb.nl/system/files/documents/08%20feb%202016/Easy-Meat-Multiculturalism-Islam-and-Child-Sex-Slavery-05-03-2014.pdf

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